Whilst I’m on the subject of Google and trying to finish half-written drafts hanging over from last year, I thought I’d briefly mention the release of Analytics for Flash.

Aside from capturing all the obvious generic statistics you’d expect from a Flash tracking package – and by being fluidly compatible with the main JavaScript library is capable of outputting all the core functionality of the existing Analytics components – the metrics offered by Google Analytics for Flash can be particularly designed to offer interesting insight into other aspects of your users’ activity you may not first expect. For example, you can collect data that can help you gauge levels of usability or (kind of) the implementation of design success. Seemingly you can monitor the behaviour of the users’ interaction during their visit too – as well as the length of the visit itself.

It’s all technically possibly, with Google’s introduction of event tracking that can be fired from custom interactions – whether that be a button click or video view or anything else. Along with that, the event can carry a payload, later received by your Analytics dashboard for your interpretation. It sounds simple – but it’s capable of being very powerful.

Previously, tracking your Flash content would be in isolation. That is to say, you could fire a tracking event when a user accesses a page of Flash content, but from there you were blind to their progress until navigating again.

This payload though, not only could detail traffic to specific sections within a Flash application (although in turn, separate events could be created for those) but could return data specific to that user and session. For example, the total time the user has spent in a particular place, or the site as a whole.

Depending on how complex you wish to be (and how many stats you want to trawl though later) this could offer very valuable data. But that data need not only be of value to an agency or advertiser. Counts for clicks on specific buttons aren’t anything new when you want to find out how many people click a ‘News’ link first, or if anyone notices the ‘Help’ button. This can be far more granular – to the point, as above, where the data could be used to inform decisions on say, design or usability.

Take a standard Flash video player as a media component you’re used to seeing on a daily basis. You can easily picture the common control bar. But how many people actually use those ‘Rewind’ and ‘Fast forward’ buttons? Could the design be improved?

Admittedly with Flash video components, you’re unlikely to see those nowadays ;) – but that (as I’ve picked this example) is the result of user testing, something this kind of tracking can’t replace – Jesse Warden has a strong sense of this in his post about Flash Analytics.

Anyway, the custom events let you send as (overly-) complex amount of data as you wish. Flash of course can be used everywhere, deployed as widgets or embedded on blogs anywhere on the Web. These Analytics though, are part of your application itself. So you can track its usage outside of the original HTML page the previous iteration of Analytics would have restrained you to.

And it’s free! Check out the code repo.

When it comes to luck you make your own.